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Oliver Brain

Dr Oliver Brain is a Consultant Gastroenterologist at Nuffield Health The Manor Hospital, Oxford and at the Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust. He has extensive experience in general gastroenterology and endoscopy, including diagnostic colonoscopy and therapeutic endoscopy. He has a research interest in the pathogenesis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease.

Michael FitzPatrick

I have been fascinated by science ad the natural world for as long as I can remember.

Nick Provine

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? I became interested in translational gastroenterology unexpectedly through my prior work on vaccine immunology, which is the subject area I studied during my PhD.

Roxanne Williams

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? In all honesty, I had not considered translational gastroenterology as a career path until I came across the advertisement for my current role as Bio-banker.

Melania Capitani

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? I come from a molecular biology background and at the beginning, I felt a bit disoriented in this new field. However, it was not long until I became fascinated by gut immunology.

Dominik Aschenbrenner

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? To study and discover the cellular and molecular networks of the human immune system and to understand key biologic processes that maintain the balance between the host response and the environment is simply fascinating.

Hannah Chen

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? I think the immune system at the mucosal interface is the most fascinating part of the body; not only does it have to prevent pathogen invasion, at the same time it also has to establish tolerance to environmental antigens and the balance is a delicate one to maintain.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Stefanie Kirchberger

How did you get interested to work in Fiona Powrie´s lab? I did my PhD in Vienna, where I worked on human rhinovirus, the virus responsible for colds, and how this virus evades a productive immune response.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Emily Wendt

How did you get interested in your scientific work? Born and raised in San Francisco, I studied Molecular and Cellular Biology at the University of California, Davis. A wonderful aspect of the Bay Area is the abundance of excellent research groups; during summer breaks I worked on research projects at UC Davis, UCSF, AstraZeneca and MedImmune.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Claire Pearson

How did you get interested in your scientific work? During my undergraduate degree I worked on a research project about why the immune system is less efficient in old age, and from this I became interested in a molecule called interleukin-7.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Hannah Chen

How did you get interested in your scientific work? My background is in virus engineering and cancer. I became interested in immunotherapy for treating solid tumours and realised that in order to develop efficacious therapies, I must first gain an understanding of how the immune system becomes dysfunctional in disease settings, such as chronic inflammation and cancer.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Sumeet Pandey

How did you get interested in your scientific work? I did my PhD in Biochemistry working on the genetic engineering of a probiotic E. coli strain. While performing experiments we observed that administration of probiotic E. coli to rats resulted in substantial anti-inflammatory effects.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Daniele Corridoni (Biography)

I obtained a Medical Biotechnology degree (2005) followed by a Masters degree in Pharmaceutical and Medical Biotechnology (2008) at the University of L’Aquila (Italy).

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Heidi Zinecker

How did you get interested in your scientific work? Although I did not experiment in my own little laboratory in the garage, biology was already one of my favourite subjects at school leading eventually to my decision to study chemistry and biochemistry.

Researcher of the Month: Dr. Julie Schulthess

How did you get interested in your scientific work? I have always been interested in understanding how things work and why they work that way. During my undergraduate studies, I discovered basic immunology and I just got caught in it.

April-May 2016: Dr. Kate Williamson

How did you become interested in the Gastroenterology field, especially in the research part of translational gastroenterology? Although I originally wanted to be a physician, I wanted a procedural physician speciality, such as gastroenterology or cardiology, so the practical nature drew me in. But the fact that gastroenterology is such a diverse speciality was the big pull.

October 2016: Malcolm Tan is a member of the Keshav Group and a medical professional.

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? By accident really! I arrived in Oxford as a clinician with the intention of learning the clinical aspects of managing IBD patients.

November 2016 Dr Tamsin Cargill

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? My first job as a newly qualified Doctor was on a gastroenterology ward. I was captivated by the medical and human complexity of many of the patients.

Researcher of the Month December 2016: Sujata Biswas is a DPhil student in the Leedham Group

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? I have been a Gastroenterology trainee in the Oxford deanery since 2011 and was fortunate to be exposed to the breadth of research available here from an early stage.

Researcher of the Month March 2017: Professor Simon Travis FRCP is the lead clinician for the Clinical IBD Group

How did you become interested in translational gastroenterology? Clinical IBD has been the core of Oxford Gastroenterology since Sidney Truelove, who performed the first randomised controlled clinical trial in Gastroenterology (steroids for ulcerative colitis) in 1955.

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